Hope

We were just starting to lead a relatively normal life when the new threat arrived in our lives. Omicron, once again, forces us to take extreme precautions, to be cautious with hugs and even to cancel some family gatherings in the coming days.
Even if the situation leads us to fall into discouragement, I would like to send with this last post of the year a brief message of HOPE, even at the risk of sounding corny.

Be mentally strong, even if pessimism gets the better of you, find the strength to spread joy, which is truly contagious. Nothing and nobody deserves that, precisely at this time of year, we feel sad. The promise of Christmas, of living what is important, of starting a new year, must win the battle against the virus. It is true that it is robbing us of trips, family moments, meetings with friends, but sooner or later we will get it back.

Let’s take advantage of this situation to get the best out of ourselves, to get to know ourselves even better, to live from the inside out, to reflect on our current life and consciously decide whether this is the lifestyle we want to embrace or whether we have been dragged into it until today.

Let us live the present with joy, yes, with the joy of feeling alive, of being alive.
And let’s dream, let’s dream a lot. May 2022 begin with new projects, new habits that help us to value what is important, which as we at Home Renaissance Foundation well know, what is important is usually the forgotten, the apparently unprofitable, the invisible, but at the same time what is essential to survive and overcome this and other crises that will come in the future.

Make home mean more than ever and love yours very much because it will be what you will have and keep forever.

The 25% of people give up on their resolutions after just a week!

As we are now half-way through January and the New Year kicks in and good resolutions abound, there’s no better place to look for inspiration than in the home.

Setting ourselves achievable tasks and goals is all about improving the wellbeing of ourselves and others, something that occurs naturally on a day-to-day basis in a well-managed home. It’s within the family that a child gains a concept of their individual worth by helping out with the running of the home and caring for others. A happy child is a well stimulated one who takes an active part and even relishes being given ‘grown up’ tasks from a very young age – just look at how some toddlers love to mimic their parents and siblings and throw tantrums if they are not allowed to join in!

The Harvard Grant study into the parenting of successful children proved a link between high achieving adults and being made to do chores as children, and subsequently seeing them as a part of life. Researchers from Pennsylvania State University and Duke University, which tracked more than 700 children from nursery age to 25, also showed achievement linked to being taught social skills from a young age, an Illinois study found that children’s overall success hinged on their parents having healthy relationships, while a survey of 6,600 US children born in 2001 discovered their drive came from their parents having high expectations of them.

So the inner confidence of setting goals and achieving them really does go back to the nurturing home. It’s where aims are shared and discussed, and initial setbacks not seen as such a bad thing in a well-supported environment where effort is valued over avoiding failure. By giving ourselves goals, we get a road map of where we are heading and the best way there. But beginning the year with small, achievable targets might be advisable if we don’t want to be counted among the 25% of people who give up on their resolutions after just a week!