Is technology a help or a hindrance in achieving work/life harmonisation?

Before the pandemic, it was beginning to become apparent that we live in a flexible world in which the workplace does not have to be the office. At Home Renaissance Foundation, team members in various cities throughout the world have been working from home for a number of years, with our headquarters in London still active as a meeting space a few days a week.

This has allowed us, quite naturally, to adapt to the period of confinement without making drastic changes because teleworking was already established. Mondays meetings set the work pattern for the rest of the week with a flexible timetable to include scheduled calls.

But what has happened in cases where adapting to a new way of working has not been so straightforward? For those not used to teleworking and surrounded by family with children in need of homeschooling?

The change has not been easy, but in general, people have managed to adapt with more or less success, considering that what we have lived through is not the best example of teleworking. We have asked around and people, in general, are satisfied. Many feel exhausted due to the circumstances and wishing for a certain normality, but happy with the potential new way of working where technology plays a leading role. Many feel that once children return to school, the new teleworking practices introduced by pioneering companies will be more effective and easier to implement.

Kathleen Farrel, Lecturer at the Technological University of Dublin, wonders “Is technology a help or a hindrance in achieving work/life harmonisation?” in her chapter of our latest book entitled “People, Care and Work in the Home” published by Routledge.

We are not going to advance her conclusions, but she contextualizes teleworking by quoting different authors, for example “Work and family could be said to be two of the most significant elements of human life” (Toyin et al., 2016). “Indeed, work/family balance is one of the most challenging issues facing families in the twenty-first century” (Walker et al., 2008).

“According to the literature on working from home, the results indicate that the success or failure of working from home is very closely linked to homeworkers’ identity.” (Tietze and Musson, 2010).

Friedman (2014: 12) highlights that to be effective one needs “to know what matters.” He recommends an exercise called “Four Circles” representing the four domains “work, home, community and self.” This helps reflect on the “values, goals, interests, actions and results” cultivated in each area, and whether the latter are compatible or opposed to each other. When people engage in flexible working, the relationship between work and home needs to be redefined and changes made. (Tietze and Musson (2003, 2005).

I would say that quarantine has helped us, without a doubt, to reflect on these issues as a family after spending so much time together. We found ourselves immersed in change without much ado and it has been shown that those who took these aspects into account achieved a more effective and above all, a true adaptation, with a personal and work balance that gradually approaches the ideal pattern.

Colin Brazier said in his article on ‘Home in the Time of Coronavirus‘ that once confined, the success of its management does not depend on “any radical change. This is not the time to introduce lessons in Sanskrit.” What has not been taught before cannot be quickly applied. What is no longer a habit is very difficult to establish or balance in crisis situations.

Therefore, the home needs to be built little by little and with tenacity. It is a titanic effort that bears its fruits in the medium and long term. Family management must include reconciliation; and teleworking, thanks to technology, can be a very useful tool that, well run, will bring results. If the home lays its foundations well, it will be able to face health crises like the current one, with job changes such as teleworking, or technological innovations that we still don’t even imagine. The important thing is that the core of the home is unbeatable in the face of storms and flexible enough not to be overwhelmed – and that requires a good leader. Don’t forget that in your home, the leader is you.

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