Call for Architects!

After many years of the cult of the body, society is beginning to realise the importance of not only taking care of the exterior body but also the interior mind. And for this reason, more and more activities such as mindfulness, spiritual retreats, and mystical experiences arise every day.

Plato said that man is “body and soul” and therefore to live is to balance both sides. Interestingly, the opposite tends to happen in households. We tend to focus a lot on the interior, on education, on relationships between family members, on the distribution of responsibilities and in some cases we forget about the exterior, which as far as homes are concerned, is just as important. If the distribution of spaces, the decor, the colour scheme, lighting…  are not well thought out, living together and the relationships between family members can be more strained.

A house in which everything has its place will create an orderly environment. An orderly environment transmits peace and calm to the members that inhabit it because when they look for something, they find it. This avoids wasting time and the consequent frustration of looking for a lost item.

Houses whose doorways are wide enough for a pushchair or wheelchair to fit and perform basic manoeuvres, denote care of the person. A practical and pleasant room where family members are comfortable will allow a better relationship between them because they will spend more time in that common area than in their own rooms.

If we go into aesthetic details, the decoration also plays its role. It is not necessary for every house to look the same, as that would be very boring, but we need to pay attention to the style. A house where you enter that is blocked by clutter can be overwhelming. It’s worth finding another place for it, and a regular thorough sort-out gets rid of everything that is surplus to requirements.

A home in which the decoration is neat and simple, where each piece of furniture has its purpose, and the decorative details reflect its occupants, is always a welcome sight.

So thinking of the happiness of homes, we call on architects from around the world to participate in our next Conference. We would like to have your ideas, listen to your studies and know what is being explored today, in the Schools of Architecture to further the design of happy homes.

In the Scientific Committee we have the Chair of Architecture of the Nottingham Trent University, Prof. Mohamed Gamal Abdelmonem and in one of the round tables will be Sonia Solicari, who is the Director of the Museum of the Home. She was previously Head of the Guildhall Art Gallery and London’s Roman Amphitheatre, Curator of Ceramics and Glass; and Assistant Curator of Paintings at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. She has published and lectured widely on Victorian art and design and contemporary museum practice. Solicari is currently co-director of the Centre for Studies of Home, a partnership with Queen Mary University of London.

Don’t forget that the Call for Papers is now open and the deadline to submit a proposal is April 30.

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